Cozmo’s Billboards

Cozmo's Day OffOne of the backgrounds I created for the interactive iOS children’s book app, Cozmo’s Day Off, by Ayars Animation contained an alien city scene, with ships and rockets zipping about. As on all of the pages, there were many fun little interactive elements on this page for kids to discover.

One of the interactive elements on page 8 is the ability to rub a couple of billboards which exposes different ads underneath. You can see below where they’re located on the page.

Cozmo's Day Off page 8

Here are some of the silly billboard designs I created for this interactive feature. The really fun thing about producing this book app was the freedom I had to be as creative or goofy as I pleased. In fact, we had far more ideas for this book app than we could feasibly implement.

Cozmo's Billboards

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More Character Design, Please

As I already noted in a previous post, I created a lot of characters for the Cozmo’s Day Off iOS app. Whimsical robots are always fun to design, and this was one of my favorites. Like some of the others, this character only makes a brief appearance, this time on page 8.Frank Grau Robot Design for Cozmo's Day Off iOS appWhat you have here is a robot dashing across the screen to get his coffee order. When he crosses back again, he’s relaxed as he carries his java fix in his grip. That’s right – even robots like a cup ‘o’ joe on occasion. Don’t you?

Why Illustrate On An iPad?

No, seriously. Why should anyone illustrate on an iPad? They’ve yet to make a proper stylus that doesn’t look and function like the blunt end of an amputee’s appendage. And without one of those all-but-useless styluses (styli?), illustrating on an iPad is literally as primitive as finger-painting.

When I first got the iPad, it wasn’t long before I was looking for an art program. It also wasn’t long before there were a number of such programs from which to choose. In the world of cheap (and often free) apps, some of these paint programs are on the higher end of the price scale. However, once we step back and see what a deal mobile apps really are, we can stop being cheapskates and try out a few of these programs.

My intent here is not to review mobile art programs. I only wanted to show a color sketch I began on my iPad, but never completed. Just from looking a this, incomplete as it is, you can see that the iPad has real potential as an art tool. If only they would create a serious stylus with which to draw and paint. In the meantime, I’ll eventually finish this on my desktop computer.

So how many of you use your iPad to create finished art? Or how many of you, like myself, are holding out for a good stylus?